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IntroductionBeeston & Lace MakingThomas PollardJohn PollardArthur PollardLace MachinesSome Pollard LaceArthur & John PollardAppendices
Pollards of Beeston

Text & Photographs
© Ernest Pollard - 2006-2007

Page Design
© David Hallam - 2007


Appendix 1 - 1920s Plan (annotated to show names mentione in the text) and description, for insurance purposes, of the buildings making up Swiss Mills,

Swiss Mills Pla 1920s

Notes, not included in the insurance description, in brackets. The well1 was 30 ft deep and was plumbed into the reservoir.

11 storey - stoke hole & boiler house 103 storeys & attic - power house, card stores, bobbin & carriage repairing unit: 10a 1 storey cotton stock room
21 storey - factory & fitting shop 11Yard roofed over
31 storey - factory 121 storey office
43 storeys - factory, card store & fitters shop 134 storeys - factory, winding, warping & beaming rooms
53 storeys - cotton & card store, oil & grease store 143 storeys & attic - factory, 1st floor, J.T. Buswell, lace manufacturer
63 storeys - bobbin rooms & card store 151 storey - used with ground floor of 16
74 storeys - offices, brown stock-room, designing offices (main factory office ground floor) 162 storeys - C. Whitehouse, lace manufacturer, factory, winding, mending & card rooms, store & offices
81 & 2 storeys - mending room, designing offices, pattern & design store 174 storeys & attic - Anglo-Scotian Lace Co. (assured trading as), J.R. Topham & brother
9Ecomomiser & chimney stack 181 & 2 storeys - confectioner's shop, dwelling house and weighing machine room


Appendix 2 - Rental in a notebook of John Pollard, 1887. Extra information from Directories of 1885 and 1891.

Costs were not fully listed, but included "Engine Drivers, £28.12.0; coal, £35.15.0; Wear & Tear £13.0.0; Oil & fat £3.10.0; Interest £78.0.0."

Factory£sd Entries in 1885 & 1891 Diectories
I. Stephens1300 Isaac, lace manufacturer
Berryman1176  
Cox8167 William, lace manufacturer
Kirkland19100 Joseph & William, lace manufacturers
Harper730 (Harper & Pare) lace manufacturers
Wright & Hurcourt3116  
Williams11173  
Cropper10146  
Stephens730  
Cooper17176  
Robinson160 Charles, Card puncher
Mellows6100  
Meaklah - shop10146  
Ditto - machine16100  
Bates & Mason/Marriott17176  
Towle & Stevenson1460 Lace manufacturers
Cooper3116  
Mycroft1460 George, lace manufacturer
Jackson12103 Charles, lace manufacturer
Rowley2120  
James32100 Mrs Hannah, lace curtain manufacturer
Saywell - shop11140 Noel, lace manufacturer
Ditto - machine13150  
Ditto - mending540  
Houses     
Heard300  
Soar300  
Lowe4176  
Thornhill650 Richard, 42 Villa St.
Small houses, Villa St.986  
Shop     
Maltby650 Wollaton Rd.
 £30737  


Statement of Affairs

Appendix 3 - Main debtors (over £50 owed) of Pollards.

From a Statement of Affairs dated 1900
All were lace merchants (manufacturers) buying lace from the factory, except Hicking (dyers).
The addresses, almost all in the Lace Market, Nottingham, are mostly taken from Fisherís Lace and Hosiery Trade Directory, 1897; those in brackets are from other sources.
The sums owed are given to the nearest pound and most will have been for lace, fairly recently supplied and awaiting settlement.

FirmSum owedAddress
Stiebel Kauffman£927Stoney Street
Birconshaw£767High Pavement
Vickers & Hine£593(Weekday Cross)
Redgate & Caborn£351Heathcote Street
Kirk & Son£292St Mary Gate
Buckland£277St Mary Gate
Hicking£211(Queens Road, dyers)
Jacoby & Co.£167(Broadgate)
Simon May£128Weekday Cross
Cuckson & Hazeldine£80High Pavement
Elliott & Williams£60(Nottingham)
Tomlinson£50(Perhaps High Pavement)


Appendix 4 - Rents paid by tenants at the Anglo Scotian Mills in 1910, the first full year under Arthur Pollardís ownership.

The nature of the businesses is as described in the 1910 Wrightís Directory of Nottinghamshire or as otherwise stated.
Rents were by "gentlemanís agreement" without formal leases.2 A standing is the space for a lace machine.

TenantQuarterly rent Notesuntil
Astle, H.B.£23.14.6 Standings and store, curtain man. Went bankrupt (note by John Pollard jnr)1921
Astle Bros£16.8.0 Two rooms. Engineers, soon renamed Anglo Scotian Engineering1927
Bates & Young
(with E.Cope & Co.)
£19.16.6 3 standings & office. (lace manufacturer in Sales Particulars)1910
Baldwin, R. & Co.£21.2.6 5 standings (lace manufacturer). Moved to Humber (note by John Pollard jnr)1910
Cuckson, Hazeldine & Manderfield, The Poplars, also Stoney St Nottm£101.5.0 Standings & store, lace manufacturer1952
Brecknock, W.£9.15.0 Standings1927
Dobson, E. & F.£75 Standings, curtain manufacturer1922
Dexter, Messrs F. & Co.£25 Standings, lace manufacturer, but became the Beeston Embroidery3 in 1911, rent of house within the factory added in 19131952
Houldsworth, J.
The Nottingham Flock Co.
£88.15.0 Replaced after 1910 by R. Koppel & Co., lace curtain manufacturer1910
Parkes & Tomlin£29.11.6 Standings & cotton store, lace manufacturer1923
Roberts, A.H.£4.4.6 Rent1909
Wallis & Longden£11.14.0 Rent, lace machinery firm1910
Truman, T.H.£17.4.6 Rent & store, lace manufacturer; replaced by Richardson1910
Thompsonshort period,
small sum
Replaced by Mears1909
Fletcher, R.£9.15.0 Lace manufacturer. From 1913 includes rent of machines as well as standings1927
 Quarterly sum
£453.6.6
Annual sum
£1813.4.0
  


Appendix 5 - Specification and valuation of machines

Part of an early (undated, but probably c1900) valuation of the lace machines in Swiss Mills.
The reader may recognise, from an earlier section, some of the features mentioned, but only the lace specialist will understand all

Machine valuation


1 John Pollard, in conversation with Sheila Mason, remembers the ice cold water from the well, even in summer. It was collected in jugs for drinking, but the Water Authorities said it was contaminated and it was capped.
2 In the same directory, 6 lace manufacturers are listed with premises in "Pollardís Factory" (Swiss Mills); Lowe Brothers, Frederick Spencer, William Spencer, Aubrey Topham, Joseph Topham and Charles Whitehouse, in addition to Pollards themselves. No rent books have been found for Swiss Mills.
3 The Beeston Embroidery was taken over by Arthur Pollard c1915.
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